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Certificate in Statistical and Computational Data Science

There are three pillars to Data Science: statistical skills, computer science and domain expertise. This certificate is offered jointly through the Statistics and Computer Science departments. The program blends topics in statistical methods, statistical computing, machine learning and algorithm development to train students to become effective data scientists for any domain. Additional skills that students will develop include the ability to work with large databases, and to manage and evaluate data sets and create meaningful output that can be used in effective decision making. More information hereQuestions about this program should be directed to csinfo@cs.umass.edu.

 

Curriculum

The Certificate is a total of 15 credits and can be completed in one year. It consists of at least two computer science courses and two statistics courses.

 

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Certificate Courses offered Fall 2018


COMPSCI 514: Algorithms for Data Science

With the advent of social networks, ubiquitous sensors, and large-scale computational science, data scientists must deal with data that is massive in size, arrives at blinding speeds, and often must be processed within interactive or quasi-interactive time frames. This course studies the mathematical foundations of big data processing, developing algorithms and learning how to analyze them. We explore methods for sampling, sketching, and distributed processing of large scale databases, graphs, and data streams for purposes of scalable statistical description, querying, pattern mining, and learning. Was COMPSCI 590D. Undergraduate Prerequisites: COMPSCI 240 and COMPSCI 311. 3 credits


COMPSCI 585: Introduction to Natural Language Processing

Natural Language Processing (NLP) is the engineering art and science of how to teach computers to understand human language.  NLP is a type of artificial intelligence technology, and it's now ubiquitous -- NLP lets us talk to our phones, use the web to answer questions, map out discussions in books and social media, and even translate between human languages.  Since language is rich, subtle, ambiguous, and very difficult for computers to understand, these systems can sometimes seem like magic -- but these are engineering problems we can tackle with data, math, machine learning, and insights from linguistics.  This course will introduce NLP methods and applications including probabilistic language models, machine translation, and parsing algorithms for syntax and the deeper meaning of text.  During the course, students will (1) learn and derive mathematical models and algorithms for NLP; (2) become familiar with basic facts about human language that motivate them, and help practitioners know what problems are possible to solve; and (3) complete a series of hands-on projects to implement, experiment with, and improve NLP models, gaining practical skills for natural language systems engineering


COMPSCI 589: Machine Learning

This course will introduce core machine learning models and algorithms for classification, regression, clustering, and dimensionality reduction. On the theory side, the course will focus on understanding models and the relationships between them. On the applied side, the course will focus on effectively using machine learning methods to solve real-world problems with an emphasis on model selection, regularization, design of experiments, and presentation and interpretation of results. The course will also explore the use of machine learning methods across different computing contexts including desktop, cluster, and cloud computing. The course will include programming assignments, a midterm exam, and a final project. Python is the required programming language for the course.


COMPSCI 590N: Introduction to Numerical Computing with Python

This course is an introduction to computer programming for numerical computing. The course is based on the computer programming language Python and is suitable for students with no programming or numerical computing background who are interested in taking courses in machine learning, natural language processing, or data science. The course will cover fundamental programming, numerical computing, and numerical linear algebra topics, along with the Python libraries that implement the corresponding data structures and algorithms. The course will include hands-on programming assignments and quizzes. No prior programming experience is required. Familiarity with undergraduate-level probability, statistics and linear algebra is assumed.


COMPSCI 590S: Systems for Data Science

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals behind large-scale systems in the context of data science. We will cover the issues involved in scaling up (to many processors) and out (to many nodes) parallelism in order to perform fast analyses on large datasets. These include locality and data representation, concurrency, distributed databases and systems, performance analysis and understanding. We will explore the details of existing and emerging data science platforms, including map-reduce and graph analytics systems like Hadoop and Apache Spark.


COMPSCI 689: Machine Learning

Machine learning is the computational study of artificial systems that can adapt to novel situations, discover patterns from data, and improve performance with practice. This course will cover the popular frameworks for learning, including supervised learning, reinforcement learning, and unsupervised learning. The course will provide a state-of-the-art overview of the field, emphasizing the core statistical foundations. Detailed course topics: overview of different learning frameworks such as supervised learning, reinforcement learning, and unsupervised learning; mathematical foundations of statistical estimation; maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation; missing data and expectation maximization (EM); graphical models including mixture models, hidden-Markov models; logistic regression and generalized linear models; maximum entropy and undirected graphical models; nonparametric models including nearest neighbor methods and kernel-based methods; dimensionality reduction methods (PCA and LDA); computational learning theory and VC-dimension; reinforcement learning; state-of-the-art applications including bioinformatics, information retrieval, robotics, sensor networks and vision.


STATISTC 535: Statistical Computing

This course will provide an introduction to the use of SAS for statistical analyses. Coverage includes data entry and manipulation, descriptive statistics and basic statistical analyses, including at least inferences for means and proportions in one and multi-sample settings and contingency tables. It is assumed that students have had a previous course covering descriptive statistics and basic statistical methods. No prior exposure to SAS is assumed.